YBoris
a blog of super awesome

08.21.14
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08.19.14
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08.18.14
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(Source: lawyerupasshole, via nkt08)

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thewescoast:

spriit:

lemonyfricket:

internet-legend:

thatfunnygarrettguy:

Jesus Christ what just happened.

look at different people each time tho

#is this problem sleuth

sHE THREW A BABY

I’ve been watching his for the past 5 minutes

thewescoast:

spriit:

lemonyfricket:

internet-legend:

thatfunnygarrettguy:

Jesus Christ what just happened.

look at different people each time tho

sHE THREW A BABY

I’ve been watching his for the past 5 minutes

(Source: raulpax, via nkt08)

08.14.14
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ca-tsuka:

Stills from Master Jiang and the Six Kingdoms, an upcoming chinese animated feature film. The trailer was animated by only 2 guys, Li Wei and Pei Fei.

(via heartbrokenasshole)

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remash:

house in yakumo ~ yaita and associates

(Source: europaconcorsi.com)

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(Source: paintedbylisu)

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edwardspoonhands:

christel-thoughts:

pattilahell:

issarae:

Necessary.

I signed a change.org petition asking that this, among other necessary policies be made mandatory by federal law. FUCKING SIGN IT.

well would you look at that…

I think this will happen…many police unions do not want it to happen, but I think it will happen. It will take a lot of time and a lot of fighting, but every moment of that fight is going to be worth it. 
Police unions will want more research, I think that’s important, and that research is being done now. While use of force and number of complaints are important statistics, so is overall crime rate (which unions will argue is adversely affected (because officers are thinking about how they’ll look on camera, not how to do their jobs) unless there are overwhelming data to counter that claim).
Also vitally important will be whether these save police departments money (which they probably will, in reduced complaints and simpler court cases.) 
And let’s not forget about privacy…if these videos are being uploaded to cloud-based evidence systems (which they probably will be) who is going to have access to them? What do you do with videos that have nothing to do with active cases? How long are videos stored for? How do you protect that data? Who decides when the cameras are on or off (civil rights orgs (and I) will argue that they must be always-on, police officers will say “what about when I’m peeing.”) And, if there’s an off switch, we can assume the off switch will get used at the exact time when we will have wanted it to be on.
As I say, this is coming, and it’s important, and it will be a force that runs counter to a lot of the bullshit police work that’s being done in some places in America…but the areas where it’s most vital will be the ones where it arrives last.
And, unfortunately, the federal government will never be able to make a blanket law because congress can’t even agree if flowers are pretty.
This is going to have to be a battle fought in every city in America individually, don’t let that drain your will. Yes, it would be better if it just happened tomorrow, but it will be worse if we all get lazy and say “it’s not happening the way I want so I don’t care if it happens at all.” 
Fuck that…we need do make it happen whatever way we can, even if it takes a long-ass time. 
Sincerely,An Old Guy

edwardspoonhands:

christel-thoughts:

pattilahell:

issarae:

Necessary.

I signed a change.org petition asking that this, among other necessary policies be made mandatory by federal law. FUCKING SIGN IT.

well would you look at that…

I think this will happen…many police unions do not want it to happen, but I think it will happen. It will take a lot of time and a lot of fighting, but every moment of that fight is going to be worth it. 

Police unions will want more research, I think that’s important, and that research is being done now. While use of force and number of complaints are important statistics, so is overall crime rate (which unions will argue is adversely affected (because officers are thinking about how they’ll look on camera, not how to do their jobs) unless there are overwhelming data to counter that claim).

Also vitally important will be whether these save police departments money (which they probably will, in reduced complaints and simpler court cases.) 

And let’s not forget about privacy…if these videos are being uploaded to cloud-based evidence systems (which they probably will be) who is going to have access to them? What do you do with videos that have nothing to do with active cases? How long are videos stored for? How do you protect that data? Who decides when the cameras are on or off (civil rights orgs (and I) will argue that they must be always-on, police officers will say “what about when I’m peeing.”) And, if there’s an off switch, we can assume the off switch will get used at the exact time when we will have wanted it to be on.

As I say, this is coming, and it’s important, and it will be a force that runs counter to a lot of the bullshit police work that’s being done in some places in America…but the areas where it’s most vital will be the ones where it arrives last.

And, unfortunately, the federal government will never be able to make a blanket law because congress can’t even agree if flowers are pretty.

This is going to have to be a battle fought in every city in America individually, don’t let that drain your will. Yes, it would be better if it just happened tomorrow, but it will be worse if we all get lazy and say “it’s not happening the way I want so I don’t care if it happens at all.” 

Fuck that…we need do make it happen whatever way we can, even if it takes a long-ass time. 

Sincerely,
An Old Guy

(via quixoticgood)

08.06.14
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socimages:

Nope!
Brain studies find that concern for justice and equality is linked to logic, not emotion.
By Lisa Wade, PhD
A new study finds that people with high “justice sensitivity” are using logic, not emotions.  Subjects were put in a fMRI machine, one that measures ongoing brain activity and shown videos of people acting kindly or cruelly toward a homeless person.
Some respondents reacted more strongly than others — hence the high versus low justice sensitivity — and an analysis of the high sensitivity individuals’ brain activity showed that they were processing the images in the parts of the brain where logic and rationality live.   “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven,” explained one of the scientists, “Rather, they are cognitively driven.”
Activists aren’t angry, they reasonably object to unjust circumstances that they understand all too well.
Image borrowed from Jamie Keiles at Teenagerie, who is a high sensitivity individual.
Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions, with Myra Marx Ferree. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

socimages:

Nope!

Brain studies find that concern for justice and equality is linked to logic, not emotion.

By Lisa Wade, PhD

A new study finds that people with high “justice sensitivity” are using logic, not emotions.  Subjects were put in a fMRI machine, one that measures ongoing brain activity and shown videos of people acting kindly or cruelly toward a homeless person.

Some respondents reacted more strongly than others — hence the high versus low justice sensitivity — and an analysis of the high sensitivity individuals’ brain activity showed that they were processing the images in the parts of the brain where logic and rationality live.   “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven,” explained one of the scientists, “Rather, they are cognitively driven.”

Activists aren’t angry, they reasonably object to unjust circumstances that they understand all too well.

Image borrowed from Jamie Keiles at Teenagerie, who is a high sensitivity individual.

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions, with Myra Marx Ferree. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.