YBoris
a blog of super awesome

09.30.14
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YBoris turned 6 today!

YBoris turned 6 today!

09.29.14
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fashionirony:

PFW: Manish Arora fw2014

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asylum-art:

Claudine O’Sullivan Illustrations

Artist on Tumblr | Facebook|  MBC

This stunning illustration by final year student Claudine O’Sullivan was judged the winner of the The Coffee Art Project 2013. Chosen from 85 entrants, her watercolour ink and pencil illustration on Khadi paper, will be auctioned to raise funds for Project Waterfall, a charity that work alongside coffee producers to provide water filtration in Tanzania and other coffee producing African countries.

Claudine, who is graduating from BA (Hons) Graphic and Media Design, Illustration and Visual Media pathway, will be showing her final work at London College of Communication’s Summer Show Three from 21 – 28 June 2013.

A traditional illustrator specialising in portraiture, she works mainly in pencil, watercolour and ink and her vivid, abstract portraits are gaining her plenty of praise, with a solo exhibition under her belt in 2013 and an exciting collaboration planned next year.

Her documentation of her time working at an Orphanage in Jaipur, which made up part of a solo exhibition in March, impressed the Managing Director of Allegra, who funded the Coffee Art Project. And a similar trip to Tanzania to photograph and document the work done by Project Waterfall may also be on the cards for early next year.

Claudine has also collaborated on a campaign with domestic violence charity Southall Black Sisters that works with women who have suffered domestic abuse. And with such raw honesty a feature of her beautiful illustrations it’s no surprise charities are keen to have her help them highlight the human faces behind their causes.

(via asylum-art)

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animalavalanche:

The Garden in the Valley of the Stars by James McCarthy

animalavalanche:

The Garden in the Valley of the Stars by James McCarthy

(via brandef)

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motleycraft-o-rama:

Fionna and Cake, by Lorena Alvarez Gómez, on Behance.

motleycraft-o-rama:

Fionna and Cake, by Lorena Alvarez Gómez, on Behance.

(via nkt08)

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This dominant narrative surrounding the inevitability of female objectification and victimhood is so powerful that it not only defines our concepts of reality but it even sets the parameters for how we think about entirely fictional worlds, even those taking place in the realms of fantasy and science fiction. It’s so normalized that when these elements are critiqued, the knee-jerk response I hear most often is that if these stories did not include the exploitation of women, then the game worlds would feel too “unrealistic” or “not historically accurate”. What does it say about our culture when games routinely bend or break the laws of physics and no one bats an eye? When dragons, ogres and magic are inserted into historically influenced settings without objection. We are perfectly willing to suspend our disbelief when it comes to multiple lives, superpowers, health regeneration and the ability to carry dozens of weapons and items in a massive invisible backpack. But somehow the idea of a world without sexual violence and exploitation is deemed too strange and too bizarre to be believable.

Tropes vs Women in Video Games, Women as Background Decoration: Part 2 (via femfreq)

And even more telling.  When people (guys) complain about ‘realism’ in games or movies, they are not really talking about literal realism.  That’s not what they mean.  The word they are reaching for is verisimilitude - in other words: that which breaks the illusion.

When we say of a piece of fiction that contains dragons, flying suits of armor, or aliens that it is ‘realistic’, what we really mean is that it feels real - that the characters reactions, the world built around the fantastical elements and how the non-fantastical elements interact with them seems “true” to us.  We look at it and nod and say to ourselves inside “Yes, that is how someone would react to seeing a giant monster” or “Yes, that seems like how society would react to an alien invasion” - the world around the made-up stuff is carefully designed and seems thought-out enough that we buy it emotionally, even if we know that logically it is nonsense.

So when someone complains that a medieval fantasy world does not feel “realistic” without the ugly oppression, dehumanization, and violation of women as a standard background element, what they are saying is that those details feel right to them.  That the world, without that misogyny, is not emotionally satisfying.  They are saying they need that there for the world to make sense.

(via adventurotica)

THIS. This so hard.

(via tygermama)

(via quixoticgood)

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hyrodium:

The curvature of curves.

  1. sin(x)
  2. exp(x)
  3. Normal distribution (y=exp(-x²/2))
  4. Ellipse
  5. r=5/2+cos(3τθ)
  6. x=(t-1)(t+1), y=t(t-1)(t+1)
  7. Archimedes’ Spiral
  8. Logarithmic spiral

If you want to try your own curve, try on Desmos graphing calculator!

https://www.desmos.com/calculator/lpm3igzbhy

(via visualizingmath)

09.25.14
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beesandbombs:

wave grid

beesandbombs:

wave grid

09.24.14
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asylum-art:

Photographer Sandro Miller Recreates Famous Portraits With John Malkovich As His Model

 sandrofilm.comedelmangallery.com | petapixel

Renowned photographer Sandro Miller has worked together with legendary Hollywood A-Lister John Malkovich many times, but when Miller wanted to celebrate the photography greats that had inspired and guided him, he had to do something special. So he, with Malkovich as his dashing unisex model, recreated some of those influential photographers’ most important portraits in a photo series called “Malkovich, Malkovich, Malkovich: Homage to photographic masters.”

The series puts both Miller’s exceptional photography and Malkovich’s masterful acting talents front and center. Miller gets each amazing portrait’s lighting, mood and composition down perfectly, while Malkovich replicates the subject’s emotions and expressions so perfectly that the photos become nearly indistinguishable, regardless of the age or gender of the original subject. And it was all done without Photoshop!

  1. Andy Warhol / Self Portrait (Fright Wig) (1986), 2014
  2. Bert Stern / Marilyn in Pink Roses (from The Last Session,1962),2014
  3. Irving Penn / Pablo Picasso, Cannes, France (1957), 2014
  4. Herb Ritts / Jack Nicholson, London (1988) (A), 2014
  5. Philippe Halsman / Salvador Dalí (1954), 2014
  6. Yousuf Karsh / Ernest Hemingway (1957), 2014
  7. Albert Watson / Alfred Hitchcock with Goose (1973), 2014
  8. Arthur Sasse / Albert Einstein Sticking Out His Tongue (1951), 214
  9. Victor Skrebneski / Bette Davis (1971), Los Angeles Studio, 2014
  10. Edward Sheriff Curtis / Three Horses (1905), 2014

Via: boredpanda